Washington families will benefit from new 3D technology for children with cerebral palsy

Diamo at a James Blunt concert

Washington is one of the world’s key centers for cerebral palsy research, clinical innovation and education.

Andiamo ankle braces have a better fit and, combined with the use of lighter and stronger materials, results in a lightweight and thinner brace, which improves stability, balance and confidence”

—Naveed Parvez

REDMOND, WASHINGTON, USA, Oct. 17, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Families in Washington to benefit from new 3D technology for children with cerebral palsy

Diamo Parvez was born with cerebral palsy and died of complications aged nine. Throughout his life, his parents constantly struggled to get him the braces and supports he needed to support his body. They channeled the pain of their loss into building a better way to make them and provide care for all families living with cerebral palsy. Diamo’s arms and legs were paralyzed and he had very little control over his head. He needed a back brace, hand splints and ankle splints – technically known as braces – to keep him out of pain.

Getting braces, however, is a long process, involving multiple appointments. It involves using plaster casts and then a trial and error process of fitting and readjusting and it often never fits.

“Sometimes there could be half an inch of space and that bad fit would cause him sores and bruises, so we had to start over and hope to keep him still enough for the mold to be accurate,” says Samiya. The whole process could take up to 3 months – by then Diamo had inevitably grown.

Diamo passed away 9 years ago this year. A year later, Naveed attended a tech conference and saw someone making 3D scans of old steam trains in order to reproduce parts with a 3D printer. “The new parts were so accurate that the paint scratches from the original were reflected perfectly in the print,” he says. He started to think about how this technology could translate into the manufacture of orthotics. “I had a moment of enlightenment — not just because of the technology, but because of the realization that all that pain could be turned into good,” he says.

Within a year, they created a prototype, and with the help of crowdfunding, they created a health tech company named after their son with a perfect Italian translation, Andiamo. It means “Let’s go” in Italian.

Andiamo does not use plaster casts. Instead, an iphone is swept over a special sock covering the child’s leg for 60 to 90 seconds. The splint therapist then uploads the scan to Andiamo’s AI-driven digital platform, Avanti, before entering the splint prescription. The objective is to reduce waiting times from several months to 48 hours. So far they have reduced it to two weeks. The Avanti platform produces ankle braces that fit better and, combined with the use of lighter and stronger materials, results in a finished product that is less bulky, thinner and less than half the weight of traditional orthotics. This leads to improved stability, better balance and increased confidence for children. said Naveed.

Sahara, fourteen, one of Andiamo’s first clients, can testify to this. The Andiamo AFO “feels good, very light,” she says, compared to her old one, which now feels “thick and heavy” in comparison. It is now easier to lift her feet and, therefore, it is also easier for her to keep her balance. Sahara’s mother, Salomé, used to take the old brace out with her when shopping for shoes, to see which one would be big enough to fit her bulky shape.

“Children with traditional ankle braces have this Frankenstein appearance – skinny legs with massive feet because they are made to be very tall and bulky with more room for the foot to grow,” she says. .

Naveed explains that Washington State is one of the world’s key centers for cerebral palsy research, clinical innovation and education. “It’s little known locally, but Seattle Childrens Hospital and UW are world famous for cerebral palsy with a number of innovations invented here over the past 50 years. It also has a stellar base of skilled therapists for whom we can build digital services.

Families can be seen by Andiamo therapists at a number of locations near Seattle. Please call 888 868 0868 or email families@andiamo.io

Hugh Sheridan
Andiamo
+1 8577770469
hugh@andiamo.io
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